Alabamians must present photo ID at the polls in 2014

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[lin_video src=http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/embed/player.js?aspect_ratio=16x9&auto_next=1&auto_start=0&div_id=videoplayer-1372288206&height=480&page_count=5&pf_id=9624&show_title=1&va_id=4118500&width=640&windows=2 service=syndicaster width=640 height=480 div_id=videoplayer-1372288206 type=script]MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WIAT) – According to Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange, Tuesday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision cleared the way for Alabama’s new photo voter ID law to begin in 2014.

The act was passed by law makers in 2011, but the state had yet to request clearance by the federal government. Under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, several states, including Alabama, are required to get federal approval before making major changes to election procedures.

“The court’s decision in the Shelby County case removed the requirement that Alabama pre-clear its changes in its voting procedures so that means that Voter ID Law will go into effect on its constitutional date,” said Strange.

For years, Alabama voters have been able to present non-photo IDs such as a utility bill,  Social Security card or a copy of a birth certificate, in order to vote.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, the law is scheduled to take effect for the 2014 primary election.

Under the new law the following forms of photo ID will be accepted:

  • Valid Alabama driver’s license or non-driver ID card
  • Valid photo voter ID card or other valid ID card issued by any state or the federal government , as long as it contains a photo
  • Valid U.S. passport
  • Valid government employee ID card with a photo
  • Valid student or employee ID card issued by a college or university in the state, provided it includes a photo
  • Valid U.S. military ID card containing a photo
  • Valid tribal ID card containing a photo

Voters without will be able to vote a provisional ballot or vote a regular ballot if the person is identified by two election officials as an eligible voter on the poll list, and both election workers sign a sworn affidavit stating so.

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