Research shows tubing injuries up 250%

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[lin_video src=http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/embed/player.js?aspect_ratio=16x9&auto_next=1&auto_start=0&div_id=videoplayer-1372287163&height=480&page_count=5&pf_id=9624&show_title=1&va_id=4118409&width=640&windows=2 service=syndicaster width=640 height=480 div_id=videoplayer-1372287163 type=script]COLUMBUS, OH. (WIAT) — The lazy days of summer are perfect for lounging in an inner tube and taking a trip down a river or lake.

However, once that inner tube becomes attached to the back of a boat, the risk for injury increases.

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio say tubing with boat injuries are up 250 percent in the last two decades.

Most injuries are to the head and upper extremities.

More often than not, though, trouble happens when the person in the tube hits the water or run into another tuber.

“Riders have very little control over the direction, over the velocity of the speed of the water tube,” Lara McKenzie with Nationwide Children’s Hospital said. “They also don’t have control over colliding with objects in the water, on the shore or with other riders on the tube.”

A few simple guidelines can be followed to make sure those who wish to enjoy some time on the water in inner tubes do so in a safe manner.

Wearing personal flotation devices is vitally necessary.

It’s also important to limit the number of tube riders to what is recommended by the tube’s manufacturer.

Lastly, it’s important to remember to stay away from other boats, water skiers and tubers.

Copyright 2013 WIAT-TV CBS 42

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