Lightning lightning go away

Lightning, lightning go away

[lin_video src=http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/embed/player.js?aspect_ratio=16x9&auto_next=1&auto_start=0&div_id=videoplayer-1376450011&height=480&page_count=5&pf_id=9624&show_title=1&va_id=4221486&width=640&windows=2 service=syndicaster width=640 height=480 div_id=videoplayer-1376450011 type=script]BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) – Unity Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa was struck by lightning on August 12th.

The sanctuary of the Jasper First Church of Nazarene was destroyed on August 9th.

A house in Vestavia was hit on August 7th and a home in Hoover in late July. Those are just a few of many fires believed to have been caused by lightning in the last few weeks.

“I guess you can’t control mother-nature” said a member of Unity Baptist Church.

Chief Meteorologist Gene Norman says many people have a big misconception about lightning.

“One of the first things I want to remind people is you don’t have to have a thunderstorm directly overhead for you to be a victim of lightning. Often times on our Titan 3d Radar we’ll see our lightning symbol but it’s not occurring where there’s a lot of rain or where a lot of the thunder storm activity is going on.”

Lightning can strike as far away as 10 miles away from a parent storm says Norman. So at the first sound of thunder you should go inside to protect yourself.

“Lightning is going to seek the tallest object that it can find and in some cases that might be your home or it might be a near by tree,” Norman adds.

You can’t lightning proof your home, but you can make sure you’re aware of changing weather conditions to know when a thunderstorm is approaching.

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