This Day in History: March 7th

TDIH Mar. 7th

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) – A march from Selma leads to “Bloody Sunday” and Alexander Graham Bell patents the telephone. Plus the Beatles make their broadcast debut, find out all the details in this edition of, “This Day in History”.

On this day in 1965, roughly 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma, Alabama for Montgomery. The march was for African-American voting rights, as well as and to commemorate the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson, who had been killed less than a month early at a voter registration march. The demonstration only made it about six blocks, to the Edmund Pettus Bridge, where the marchers were met by state and local lawmen. The officials attacked the demonstrators with billy clubs and tear gas until they were forced to head back to Selma. That march became known as “Bloody Sunday” and was one of the many volatile moments throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

On this day in 1876, Alexander Graham Bell filed a patent for the telephone. Bell’s patent filing beat Elisha Gray’s similar claim by a mere two hours.

On this day in 2010, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win an Academy Award for best director, for “The Hurt Locker.” She was also only the 4th woman at the time to even be nominated in the director category.

On this day 1996, the first surface photos of Pluto were captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.

On this day in 1962, the Beatles made their broadcasting debut, appearing on BBC radio.

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