Community bands together to save 22 dogs from being put down

animal-shelter-plans-to-euthanize-dogs-by-christmas-eve

FAYETTE, Ala. (WIAT) — A number of dogs scheduled to be euthanized at the Fayette County Animal Shelter are getting a second chance.

The 22 dogs received a reprieve because several groups came to the shelter on Tuesday morning to adopt them, including The Greater Birmingham Humane Society, which picked up ten dogs.

CEO Allison Black Cornelius says she was glad to help, but says more needs to be done in the future to prevent this from happening again.

“I think that this shelter is indicative of several shelters in Alabama that we as a society need to take a look at, and our policies how we manage the over population of animals not only in Alabama, but the southeast,” Cornelius said. “There has got to be a longer term solution we can all work on to figure out how we can fix this problem.”

Rachel Waid agrees with the Greater Birmingham Humane Society.  Waid is the Director of Sasha’s Hope and Rescue in Jasper, and she adopted seven dogs.

“I think it’s just a traditional Christmas miracle, and you get to see the values and morals the rescue community has,” Waid said. “They could be helping people from their own county and city, but we’ve pulled together to help another small Alabama town.”

On Monday, the Fayette County Animal Shelter announced that it was going to euthanize all 22 dogs if they couldn’t be adopted by Christmas Eve.  The shelter’s situation was described as a Code Red, meaning the animals’ time was limited. The county commission requires that shelter dogs be euthanized after seven to ten days.

Now that all the dogs are safe, Director Misti Bellar is praising the community for helping to save these animals.

“Having them come and step up and help clear the shelter and help with the numbers, and help possibly set up programs that could help us out in the future for other animals coming in, that’s a blessing,” Bellar said.

The Director is hoping pet owners can learn from this and will spay and neuter their pets to help prevent future overcrowding.

 

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